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Bacolod City, PhilippinesSaturday, May 3, 2014
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Editorial

Willpower and manpower

Daily Star logo
Published by the Visayan Daily Star Publications, Inc.
NINFA R. LEONARDIA
Editor-in-Chief & President

CARLA P. GOMEZ
Editor

CHERYL CRUZ
Desk Editor
PATRICK PANGILINAN
Busines Editor

NIDA A. BUENAFE

Sports Editor
RENE GENOVE
Bureau Chief, Dumaguete
MAJA P. DELY
Advertising Coordinator

CARLOS ANTONIO L. LEONARDIA
Administrative Officer

This is a reprise of an existing ordinance or law on what is considered a national pastime, or ailment, whichever side you may be on. This refers to the “no smoking” signs in public places, including transport, conveyances, and thoroughfares.

However, in several areas in the country, including Dumaguete City, rampant smoking in public places has been observed, despite the ordinance. Initially, enforcement was implemented in the city, warnings were made and fines imposed, sending a message that it was a serious business on the part of the enforcers, and of relief to residents who began to feel assured of clean air to breathe.

But, as reality began to creep in, logistical considerations came into the picture. While the spirit was willing, manpower was lacking. While human resource may be available to apprehend violators, did it solve the problem of chronic smoking? This involves the willpower of the smoker to stop the habit altogether. Thus, willpower and manpower are needed to go together to make the national campaign a success.

In the tiny Himalayan nation of Bhutan, an attempt was made to ban smoking completely, but it was met with vehement negative reaction from the citizens. Somehow, smoking for the citizen of Bhutan was related to their culture, thus, banning smoking was regarded as a move to obliterate their cultural heritage.

While this may not be acceptable to those who know that smoking, including passive or second-hand smoking, is dangerous to one's health, the decision ultimately rests on the user. Until this is resolved among the stakeholders, the “no smoking” law will continue being a lame-duck effort.*

 
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